Book Review: A Culinary Journey through Time

A Culinary Journey through Time: A Cookery Book with Recipes from the Stone Age to the Middle Ages,
by Sabine Karg, Regula Steinhauser-Zimmermann, and Irmgard Bauer.
Price: 20 euros

A Culinary Journey through Time is a must have for adventurous cooks, European history enthusiast, and period writers.  The recipes in the book are based on actual archeological finds and analysis of food remains found in cook pots and the charred food remains found near hearths during archaeological excavations.  All recipes are marked by period: Stone Age, Bronze Age, Iron Age, Roman Times, Viking Age, and Middle Ages.  Also, recipes are color coded by season according to when ingredients are naturally available.

Continue reading


A Flair for Solar Cooking

My article, A Flair for Solar Cooking, And Sparks over the “Hippy” Method is featured in the August 2017 edition of IDAHO Magazine.

Sharon Cousins, was kind enough to share her experience with me during a solar cooking lesson at her residence in Viola, Idaho.  The story includes a recipe for her famous vanilla cake which, I can assure you, is delicious.  While waiting for the cake to bake, she regaled me with tales of solar cooking adventures from around the world.

Photo: Sharon proudly displays her golden vanilla cake, which miraculously came out of the pan in one piece!  Photo Credit: Joshua Yeidel

Locals can read a copy of IDAHO Magazine at either the Moscow or Potlatch libraries.  Or if you would like your own copy, they are generally available at BookPeople of Moscow.  Also, a copy of this issue can be purchased directly from IDAHO Magazine by clicking here: http://www.idahomagazine.com/shop/2017-8-august-2017-sugar-city/

 


Lughnasad 2017

Being Pagan is difficult.  Sure there’s discrimination, nasty comments, and the like, but you also have to figure out when to celebrate your holidays.  Christians have it easy; the calendar is designed around their holy days, church happens every Sunday.  But for Pagans it’s a bit more difficult.  Astronomers have been kind enough to track the solstices and equinoxes for us and make those dates readily available, but when it comes to the cross-quarter days, we’re on our own.

Continue reading